Mood Management

Mood Management workshop

Aim & Context

What is the aim of the exercise?
This exercise aims to generate a better understanding of what are moods and how to navigate them
In what context is this exercise useful?
This exercise can be useful to learn how to change one’s mood. Ideally from a negative one to a positive mood.

Quick facts

Preparation time: 15 min
Workshop time: 90 min
Ideal group size: 12+ people (will do groups of 4)
Contact of Workshop Developer:
Equipment and tools needed:
  • Papers
  • Pens
  • Thinking / focus music
  • Something to play music (e.g., speakers, laptop)
  • Beamer or flipchart for this image:
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Detailed Description of Activity & Method

Please list step by step how the activity should be facilitated

Activity & Format
Time
Instructions
Facilitation Notes
Check-In
5 min
  • Introduction of facilitators
  • Present agenda
  • Check-in question: In what mood are you right now?
Start with answering the check-in question. Write down their answers.
Topic introduction and sharing
20 min
Explain difference between emotions and moods.
Emotions are in constant flux, they tend to be lived right here, right now and not necessarily last a long time.
Moods are more medium to long-term. They tend to stick for many days in a row. It can sometimes be difficult to change your mood. Moods are more similar to a mindset.
Breakout group questions:
  • Ask participants to share what they think is mood management?
  • Why is mood management important?
Split participants in groups of 4 people. Give them 10 minutes to talk.
Then regroup all together for 5-10 minutes and discuss main takeaways from each group.
Exercise: positivity
10 min
Ask participants to take a sheet of paper and a pen.
Task 1: Ask participants to make a list of all the positive things that are happening or that they have in their lives. These should also include relatively basic and granular things, such as having abundance of food, eating something specific that they like, enjoying coffee or tea in the morning, having friends, family, being healthy, etc. They should focus on the positive things that are happening in your life.
Task 2: See the flip side of the coin. Ask participants to think about something that is not going well in their lives (can be something happening currently, or that happened recently).
  • What are the negative aspects of this situation or thing?
  • What is the flip side of the coin? What may be the positive things relating or coming out of such a situation? These can be subtle, small or seemingly irrelevant. Ask participants to write all of them (even potential or unclear ones).
Allow 5 minutes for each task (list of positive things & flip side of coin)
Play some focus music while participants reflect individually.
Group sharing
10 min
Split participants in groups of 2.
During this sharing session, participants can share between each other about their individual reflection.
What are some of the positive things they wrote about?
What are some of the flip sides of the coin they wrote?
Do they have some in common?
As participants share their input, write down the key elements for group viewing (e.g., on a flipchart or blank slide).
BREAK
5 min
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Input: Shifting moods
5 min
BELIEF - BODY - FEELING
As Dan Newby explains, each emotion and moods have a story/belief, a body representation, and a related feeling.
You want to train your body and stories to match. You can then connect the body position and the stories that are associated to them. Just thinking differently, is generally not enough.
Could also be, going for a walk, eating something, taking a bath. You want to address the body, and that could help to shift the emotion or mood.
Display the picture or reproduce it on a flipchart to visualize the content.
See picture attached (shifting emotions and moods).
Group exercise: Shifting moods
20 min
Let’s try out the input together.
Conceptualising the bad mood:
Think about and imagine a moment when you were in a bad mood or represent your current bad mood if that’s applicable.
  • Write down (4 min): what is the story and belief associated to this negative mood?
  • Write down (3 min): how does it feel? Name your feelings.
  • Adjust your body position to that feeling and belief. Hold this position for two minutes. Let it sink in.
Conceptualizing the good mood:
Think about and imagine a moment when you were in a good mood or represent your current good mood if that’s applicable.
  • Write down (4 min): what is the story and belief associated to this positive mood?
  • Write down (3 min): how does it feel? Name your feelings.
  • Adjust your body position to that feeling and belief. Hold this position for two minutes. Let it sink in. Focus on trying to switch the story in your mind.
Allow 10 minutes for each mood conceptualization.
Invite participants to spread in the workshop space where they feel comfortable. If online, they can turn off their camera if easier for them.
Guide participants by providing instructions and questions gradually. Allowing time between each instruction for them to write and participate. Indicate them how much time they have for each part.
Sharing debrief
10 min
Ask participants to share about their experience relating to the mood conceptualization.
  • How did they go about doing the exercise?
  • What are the key takeaways they take from this session?
Write down the key elements for group viewing (e.g., on a flipchart or blank slide).
Check-out
5 min
  • Provide logistical info about next planned workshop (if any)
  • Check-out suggestion if small group: Get each person to say what is their mood in one word after this workshop.
  • Thank people for joining. Invite people to retry this exercise at home and see if they get different results.

Feedforward: Tips for future facilitators

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Resources (Helpful websites or books for further reading)